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Gambling.com Domain up for Sale; Media Corp Expecting Millions

4 January 2011 by Devon Chappell

gamblingcomIf you’ve ever wondered just how much money is involved in the online gambling industry, take a look at the website Gambling.com. Actually, you don’t even have to take a look – just pay attention to the next sentence. The owner of the website, London-based Media Corporation, has announced it is selling the domain, and is expecting to get somewhere in the neighborhood of $10 million.

Truth be told, the domain may never sell for this much. However, according to Media Corp.’s CEO, Justin Drummond, an offering of $6 million has already been laid on the table. The German brokerage firm, Sedo, which happens to be the world’s largest domain marketplace, has put the domain up on the “chopping block” (albeit there isn’t going to be any “chopping” taking place).

It has been allegedly reported that both Playtech and the Gibraltar-based online betting site, Bet365, have shown interest in acquiring the domain. Now, if that were the case, and the likes of either Playtech or Bet365 were to get ownership of Gambling.com, rest assured there will be some post-chopping taking place, i.e., major site overhaul and redesign.

That’s because Gambling.com is currently operating through advertising fees and possibly affiliate commissions (I cannot verify the latter). However, if you look at the site (okay, now you can look), it’s similar to your’s truly – Online Casino Suite. There are several online casinos and internet betting destinations linked up on the homepage, sans the (dare I say) wealth of online casino reviews and (dare I say) entertaining blog op-ed’s found here at OCS. Therefore, you can imagine the likes of Bet365 would not be using the domain to advertise competitor sites. Rather, they would use it as a platform to promote their own site, skins and any other sites they might own. The same goes for Playtech.

As the domain itself suggests, paying a pretty penny is a gamble in itself. Media Corp paid a whopping $20 million for the domain back in 2005. Although it generated $5.5 million in advertising fees the year thereafter, the US online gambling ban (UIGEA) was passed, and that put a huge damper on the revenue flowing in. Drummond himself attests that “Gambling.com does not contribute too much revenues at the month”, and that it’s ultimate success is contingent on a repeal of the online gambling ban in the States.

The way things look, this is a likely possibility. Senate Majority Leader, Harry Reid, has vowed he will continue efforts to pass federal legislation to regulate online poker, which would bid well for a domain like Gambling.com. However, there is also the consideration of getting Gambling.com more friendly with search engines like Google. Contrary to some reports stating that Gambling.com ranks #1 for the term “gambling” on Google, this is for Google.co.uk, NOT for Google.com. In fact, Gambling.com doesn’t show up in the Top 100 search results.

But even with that being the case, Gambling.com does bring in a wealth of traffic via the UK online gambling crowd – over 300,000 hits per month. There is value to the domain. The question is whether anybody will be willing to pay for a potential value basically resting on the actions of the U.S. government.

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